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Who Owns F1 Tracks? (Full List Of 25 Circuits)

Formula 1 tracks are state-of-the-art and have to meet strict requirements to host races. Keeping the tracks up to FIA Grade 1 standard is the responsibility of the track’s owner. Formula 1 tracks are often privately owned, and the responsibility of running the track falls onto the owner.

The owners of the 25 F1 tracks are:

  1. Bahrain International Circuit – Mumtalakat Group
  2. Jeddah Corniche Circuit – Saudi Motorsport Company
  3. Albert Park Circuit – Australian Grand Prix Corporation
  4. Autodromo Internazionale Enzo e Dino Ferrari (Imola) – Con-Ami Holdings Company
  5. Miami International Autodrome – Stephen Ross
  6. Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya – The Circuits de Catalunya, S.L. 
  7. Circuit de Monaco – Automobile Club de Monaco
  8. Baku City Circuit – Baku City Circuit Operation Company
  9. Circuit Gilles Villeneuve – Automobile Club of Île-Notre-Dame
  10. Silverstone Circuit – British Racing Drivers’ Club
  11. Red Bull Ring – Dietrich Mateschitz 
  12. Circuit Paul Ricard – Slavia Ecclestone
  13. Hungaroring – Hungaroring Sport Zrt
  14. Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps – Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps
  15. Circuit Zandvoort – Chapman Andretti Partners
  16. Autodromo Nazionale di Monza – Commune di Monza & Milano
  17. Marina Bay Street Circuit – Ong Beng Seng / Singapore GP Pte Ltd
  18. Suzuka International Racing Course – Honda Motor Group
  19. Circuit of the Americas – The Circuit of the Americas LLC
  20. Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez – Government of Mexico City
  21. Autódromo José Carlos Pace – State Ownership / Brasil Motorsports / Mubadala
  22. Yas Marina Circuit – Abu Dhabi Motorsports Management
  23. Losail International Circuit – Qatar Motor & Motorcycle Federation 
  24. Las Vegas Street Circuit – Liberty Media
  25. Shanghai International Circuit – Shanghai Jiushi Group / Shanghai International Automobile City

It can sometimes be difficult to find information on the owners of a Formula 1 circuit. Oftentimes the track might be owned by the state or by a private company. Below, we’ll be getting into the details of the owners of all the tracks on the current F1 calendar a few that may appear in future.

Are F1 Tracks Permanent?

F1 tracks are permanent. Once they are built, they are there to stay. As such, it’s a commitment when it comes to building a Formula 1 track, as it often can’t be repurposed afterward either. F1 tracks may cost $200 million or more to build, and they cost millions more per year to maintain.

Formula 1 circuits will need to host other motorsport series in order to generate more money and make a profit. Hosting Formula 1 is expensive, and sometimes the circuits don’t even make a profit, which can lead to the tracks being abandoned after a couple of years. Abandoned tracks will deteriorate over time, which makes them a waste of money and space.

It’s not always possible to destroy Formula 1 tracks to clear space either. The owners won’t be investing any further funds into rebuilding or taking down the track, and it’s highly unlikely that anyone else will be doing the same unless they have millions of dollars to buy the property and develop it.

For this reason, Formula 1 tracks are often left just as they are. The massive amounts of costs involved in buying, redeveloping, and rebuilding these race tracks mean that it’s not an attractive offer for many people. However, there is a slim chance that it could happen, as we’ve seen with South Africa’s Kyalami circuit.

How Do New F1 Tracks Get A Place On The Calendar?

For F1 tracks to get a place on the calendar, they first need to be built up to the FIA Grade 1 requirements. They’ll need to send an application to the FIA, which will spend time considering the application. If successful, final adjustments will be made, and they’ll be added to the calendar.

New Formula 1 tracks are added to the calendar every couple of years. However, it’s not always a simple process. The tracks first need to be built or upgraded as they need to meet FIA Grade 1 requirements. These are the minimum requirements required to host a Formula 1 race, and the bar is set really high.

Sending The Application

Tracks that want to host a Formula 1 race will first need to send in an application to the FIA, which will result in a series of meetings between the two parties to discuss the circuit, where it will be placed on the calendar, as well the funds they need to pay to host the Grand Prix. Each circuit has to pay millions of dollars per year to host Formula 1 races.

Following the discussions with the FIA, the track’s owners will make any adjustments needed to meet their standards. After the final inspections and an agreement on the date of the Grand Prix, an official announcement will be made to reveal the new Grand Prix being added to the Formula 1 calendar.

From there, the track owners need to keep paying their annual fees, usually as part of a 10-year contract, and they need to keep up the maintenance of the track to ensure that it complies with the FIA Grade 1 standards. Formula 1 is very strict about the safety of drivers, crew members, and spectators, so if their requirements are not met, the Grand Prix can be canceled.

KEY POINTS

• F1 tracks are expensive to build and maintain, so most are permanent racing venues

• New tracks must be up to FIA Grade 1 standards to host an F1 race

• It costs millions of dollars per year for a contract to host a regular Formula 1 race

A Note On Our List

Below, we list all of the current F1 tracks and their respective owners. You’ll notice we have 25 in our list, and that’s because there are going to be three tracks added to the calendar from 2023, and it’s unclear if any will lose their spot to make way for them. While the Shanghai circuit, contracted until 2025, has been absent for a few years now, it may not return until 2024.

However, we’ve kept it on our list as it is still under contract with F1. The Las Vegas circuit will debut in 2023, so we’ve added it in as well. While the exact location of the Qatar race is yet to be confirmed, F1 held a race at the Losail circuit in 2021 and so it’s likely to be held there until any other option, like a Doha street circuit, appears. 

List Of 25 F1 Track Owners 

1. Bahrain International Circuit – Mumtalakat Group

The Bahrain International circuit has been on the calendar since 2004. The Kingdom was the spark that ignited a series of Middle Eastern races as interest in the sport flared up quickly in the region. Bahrain has become a regular season opener and, more recently, has also become the scene of preseason testing. 

The Bahrain International Circuit is set to remain on the Formula 1 calendar until at least 2036 with their latest deal. The Bahrain International Circuit is owned by the Mumtalakat Group. The Mumtalakat Group is the sovereign wealth fund of Bahrain and is owned by the government of the Kingdom of Bahrain.

2. Jeddah Corniche Circuit – Saudi Motorsport Company

The Jeddah street circuit is a relative newcomer to the Formula 1 calendar. It’s been controversial ever since it first arrived on the F1 calendar in 2021. The entire Formula 1 community had concerns about the track’s safety, and some drivers raised questions about the dangers that they faced on the track.

The Jeddah Corniche Circuit is owned by the Saudi Motorsport Company, which was established to promote Formula 1 in the country. Martin Whitaker is the CEO of the company and aims to establish Saudi Arabia as a renowned motorsports venue.

3. Albert Park Circuit – Australian Grand Prix Corporation

The Albert Park street circuit in Melbourne has long been the site of the season opener for Formula 1. The race takes place on the streets of Albert Park

The Albert Park street circuit has recently undergone an overhaul to change the layout of the circuit and better suit modern Formula 1 cars. The Melbourne Grand Prix is a challenge for organizers since it’s made up of the area’s public roads. This means that the entire circuit needs to be built up in preparation for the Grand Prix.

Grandstands and barriers need to be put up, and the road surface needs to be cleaned. When the race is over, the entire setup needs to be taken down again. The Albert Park race is organized by the Australian Grand Prix Corporation, whose chairman is Paul Little.

4. Autodromo Internazionale Enzo e Dino Ferrari (Imola) – Con-Ami Holdings Company

Imola (officially known as the Autodromo Internazionale Enzo e Dino Ferrari) is a historic circuit in Italy that has been on the calendar for many years in the past. The circuit was dropped from the calendar in 2007 but made a surprise return as a replacement circuit during the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020.

The Emilia-Romagna Grand Prix has remained on the calendar ever since. The famous circuit is challenging for the drivers, but it’s also difficult to overtake on this narrow circuit. With limited overtaking opportunities, drivers need to make the most of qualifying, their race starts, and their strategy.

The previous owners of the Imola circuit, SAGIS, struggled with debt as they worked to modernize the circuit. They were in deep financial trouble when Formula 1 eventually left in 2007. The Imola race track in Italy is now owned by Com-Ami Holdings company which was newly established in 2010 specifically to take over the troubled Imola circuit.

5. Miami International Autodrome – Stephen Ross

The Miami International Autodrome made its first appearance on the Formula 1 calendar in 2022. The street circuit flows around the famous Miami Dolphins football stadium and features a unique layout different from anything else that we’ve seen on the Formula 1 calendar.

Downtown Miami is the scene of the second annual Grand Prix in the United States. The Miami Grand Prix is set to stay on the calendar for ten years following an agreement between Formula 1, the Miami Dolphins, and the Miami Gardens.

The circuit is owned by Stephen Ross, who is also the owner of the Miami Dolphins football team. Stephen Ross is a real estate developer, philanthropist, and sports team owner with an estimated net worth of $8.2 billion.

6. Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya – The Circuits de Catalunya, S.L. 

The Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya is in Barcelona and has made a regular appearance on the calendar since 1991. Aside from undergoing some overhauls to suit the cars in the early 2010s, the circuit has remained largely the same and is still considered to be one of the best race tracks in the world.

The Barcelona track is often used for preseason testing because of how versatile the circuit is. With a long main straight and mix of low to high-speed corners, this track is perfect when it comes to testing the car’s capabilities, as well as the driver’s skills.

This track is owned by the Circuits de Catalunya, S.L,. and the president of the company is Maria Teixidor, who was given the position in 2020. Previously, Vicenç Aguilera had held the position for several years before the changeover took place in early 2020.

7. Circuit de Monaco – Automobile Club de Monaco

Monaco is considered to be the crown jewel of the Formula 1 calendar. Being the most glamorous and star-studded Grand Prix of the year, this unique street circuit is one of the most challenging for all Formula 1 drivers. The Monaco Grand Prix is the go-to race for many celebrity spectators who watch the cars from yachts and hotels alongside the circuit.

Monaco is also one of the oldest Grand Prix on the calendar, with the layout remaining the same for many years. The cars, however, have outgrown the narrow city streets, making overtaking nearly impossible. Modern Formula 1 cars struggle around the track, but it’s still spectacular to watch. This has put Monaco’s position on the calendar under threat for future seasons.

There is no true standalone ‘Monaco circuit’ as it’s made up of the city’s streets. However, the race is organized by the Automobile Club de Monaco. Just like Albert Park, there’s a lot of work that goes into preparing this circuit, including the building of grandstands, building barriers, and even welding down the drain covers to prevent the cars’ downforce from dislodging them on track.

8. Baku City Circuit – Baku City Circuit Operation Company

The Baku City street circuit has been on the calendar since 2016, and it’s produced a thrilling Grand Prix every season. It might be a street circuit, but it’s the polar opposite of the Monaco Grand Prix, with much higher speeds and a much better chance of overtaking other cars.

Baku has been a fan favorite circuit ever since it was added, and the uniquely fast street circuit is challenging for both the drivers and the engineers. There’s a unique car setup that is needed at this particular circuit, which is challenging to pin down.

Just like the other street circuits, a lot of behind-the-scenes work goes into this track in order to prepare it for Formula 1 cars. The Baku City Circuit Operation Company was put together with the Grand Prix being announced, and they are responsible for all the hard work that goes on behind the scenes.

9. Circuit Gilles Villeneuve – Automobile Club Of Île-Notre-Dame

The Canadian Grand Prix is home to fond memories for many drivers, including Lewis Hamilton and Daniel Ricciardo, who both experienced their first Grand Prix victories at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, named after Canadian Ferrari Formula 1 driver Gilles Villeneuve.

While it’s technically a street circuit built on a man-made island, it’s also a permanent race track which makes it unique from all other street tracks on the Formula 1 calendar. The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve has been on the calendar since 1978.

The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve is owned, maintained, and run by the Automobile Club Of Île-Notre-Dame, which was founded in 1991. The president of the organization is Elise Racette, with the vice president being Iskandar Saikali, who is also in charge of track safety.

10. Silverstone Circuit – British Racing Drivers’ Club

Silverstone has been an established venue on the Formula 1 calendar for many years. Hosting its first race in 1948, the track was built using an old airfield. The fast, flowing corners make this one of the best places to watch a Formula 1 car, with famous corners such as Copse, Becketts, and Maggots testing the limits of both Formula 1 cars and drivers.

The British Grand Prix is a home race for the majority of Formula 1 teams because of how close the venue is to their headquarters and factories. This, along with the fact that the British Grand Prix normally marks the halfway point of the season, means that teams often bring large upgrade packages for their cars to the Silverstone race track.

The Silverstone racetrack is owned by the British Racing Drivers’ Club, which is one of the most prestigious motor racing clubs in the world. The president of the BRDC is David Coulthard, who was elected in 2019. The President in Chief is the HRH Duke of Kent K.G.

11. Red Bull Ring – Dietrich Mateschitz

The Austrian race track was previously known as the A1 Ring and was regularly used in Formula 1 for many years until it was dropped from the calendar in 2001. The picturesque mountains and Austrian countryside paint the perfect backdrop for the pinnacle of motorsport, so it was only a matter of time before this short and fast circuit made a return to the sport.

The track was bought over by Red Bull owner Dietrich Mateschitz in 2004, completely overhauled, and reopened in May 2011. The Austrian billionaire has 49% ownership of the energy drink giant and so also named the race track after the successful business. Renamed the Red Bull Ring, the Austrian circuit made a comeback in 2014, becoming a regular venue for Formula 1 ever since.

The circuit is well run under the supervision of Mateschitz, and the venue even hosted two Grands Prix in 2020 and 2021, something that’s never happened before in the sport. This was done as the circuit replaced other venues that were dropped from the calendar due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

12. Circuit Paul Ricard – Slavia Ecclestone

The French circuit of Paul Ricard has not been among the fan favorites in recent years. The circuit isn’t the best for overtaking, and it doesn’t necessarily have any standout features in its track layout that challenge the drivers. Its inability to regularly produce races with high entertainment value means that its position on the Formula 1 calendar could be at risk in the future.

The Paul Ricard circuit is state-of-the-art, with abrasive painted run-off areas as a safer option for both cars and drivers rather than close walls around the track. Among many of the track’s impressive facilities is a landing strip suitable for private jets. 

The owner of the Paul Ricard race track is Slavia Ecclestone, ex-wife of former Formula 1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone. Slavia inherited the race track through their divorce, and the circuit was added to the Formula 1 calendar in 2018.

13. Hungaroring – Hungaroring Sport Zrt

The Hungaroring is in the capital city of Budapest. The track is known to be difficult to overtake on despite the long main straight and the addition of DRS. It’s home to the shortest DRS zone in F1. The tight and twisty second and third sectors are challenging for drivers, but the narrow circuit makes it difficult for cars to get past each other despite being bunched up.

The Hungaroring has a long history in the sport, being a regular venue on the calendar since 1986. At just 4.381 kilometers long (2.72 miles), it’s one of the shorter circuits on the calendar, featuring 70 laps during the Grand Prix.

The Hungarian racetrack is owned by a company named Hungaroring Sport ZRt, which was set up specifically to organize and manage the circuit and surrounding facilities. The president and CEO of the company is Zsolt Gyulay.

14. Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps – Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps

The Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps is famous for many reasons. Firstly, it’s the longest circuit on the Formula 1 calendar at 7.004 kilometers (4.352 miles), which means that it also features the lowest number of laps compared to any other circuit on the calendar, with just 44.

What the circuit is perhaps most famous for though is the terrifying Eau Rouge-Raidillon complex. While it might be flat out in a modern Formula 1 car, the elevation change is unlike anything else a Formula 1 driver will experience, and it’s one of the most challenging sections on the calendar.

The Belgian racetrack is owned and operated by a company of the same name, Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. While the circuit is bathed in history and fame, its position on the calendar is under threat as it could be making way for new venues when its contract with Formula 1 runs out in the near future – something that much of the Formula 1 community is extremely unhappy about!

15. Circuit Zandvoort – Chapman Andretti Partners

Zandvoort is a race track that has a lot of history, but it also had a long absence from the Formula 1 calendar. The narrow, twisty circuit with banked corners made a spectacular return in 2021, and the crowd arrived in full force to support their home hero Max Verstappen.

The Zandvoort circuit is 4.259 kilometers long (2.645 miles) and is situated in the Zandvoort resort town of the Netherlands. The circuit was originally built in 1948 as the post-war motorsport fever took over Europe. The circuit was a mixture of racetrack and public roads but has now been turned into a purpose-built racetrack. 

The Zandvoort circuit was originally built by the Dutch Automobile Racing Club but is now owned by the Chapman Andretti Partners (no relation to Colin or Mario, although it’s likely named after them). The founders of the company, Menno de Jong and Bernhard van Oranje, took over the racetrack in 2016 with plans to bring Formula 1 back to the Netherlands.

16. Autodromo Nazionale di Monza – Commune di Monza & Milano

Monza is the home of the Tifosi. The Ferrari fans pack the grandstands full of red when Formula 1 is in town, and it’s normally the most passionate crowd that you’ll find at any Grand Prix, especially when Ferrari has a competitive car. 

Known as the “Temple of Speed,” the Monza circuit is famous for being the fastest race track on the calendar. The cars have the highest average speed around this circuit, with the track holding records for the fastest pole position in terms of average speed and the fastest average race speed.

The Monza circuit is a jointly owned venture between the Commune di Monza & Milano. These two entities are also responsible for managing the circuit, organizing events, and ensuring that the circuit remains in good condition throughout the year.

17. Marina Bay Street Circuit – Ong Beng Seng / Singapore GP Pte Ltd

The Marina Bay Street Circuit in Singapore was the scene of the first-ever Formula 1 night race. The race was first held in 2008, which set the scene for future night races such as Abu Dhabi and Bahrain. The Singapore Grand Prix is held on a street circuit with a mix of high and low-speed corners.

The tight and twisty track is known for being one of the most physical races of the year, as humidity and high ambient temperatures cause exhaustion among drivers and crew members. It’s also the longest race of the season, with the average race time being about 1 hour and 45 minutes, just shy of the two-hour cut off for a Grand Prix.

The track is owned by Ong Bend Seng, a Singaporean billionaire, and the Grand Prix is organized by the Singapore GP Pte Ltd. Just like other street circuits, there’s a lot of behind-the-scenes work that goes into making this event happen as the streets are used for daily commuting when Formula 1 is not in town.

18. Suzuka International Racing Course – Honda Motor Group

Suzuka is one of the most famous race tracks in the world. It also has a rich history in Formula 1, with some of the most memorable moments on the track involving Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost. The circuit might have had a two-year absence from the calendar due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but it’s a firm favorite for the entire Formula 1 community as well as the teams and drivers.

The fast-flowing first sector is one of the best sectors in Formula 1. Just like in Silverstone, these corners suit the strengths of a Formula 1 car, making it a spectacular place to see what the cars are capable of. The rest of the circuit is just as great though, with 130R featuring as one of the fastest corners on the calendar, with drivers taking it at up to 190 miles per hour.

The Suzuka circuit is owned by the Honda Motor Group. The Japanese automotive giant built the circuit in 1962 as the group was in need of a test track for their cars. The track hosted its first Grand Prix in 1987 and has been a regular venue for the sport ever since.

19. Circuit Of The Americas – The Circuit Of The Americas LLC

The Circuit of the Americas was the scene of Formula 1‘s return to the United States after several years back in 2012. Following the Indianapolis Speedway being dropped from the calendar in 2008, a brand new, state-of-the-art circuit was built in Austin, Texas.

The circuit was designed specifically with Formula 1 cars in mind, and the FIA Grade 1 standard meant that safety was never going to be an issue, which was the main problem at Indianapolis. The venue has been the scene of many dramatic moments, and it’s brought the sport back to the States with a bang. In 2021 the circuit had a record weekend attendance of 400,000 spectators.

The circuit is owned and managed by a company with the name Circuit of the Americas LLC. The company was set up specifically to be in charge of the circuit. Strict maintenance and management of the circuit are required in order to keep the pinnacle of motorsport coming back to this massively successful race track.

20. Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez – Government Of Mexico City

The Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez is Formula 1’s venue in Mexico City. The track is still relatively new to the calendar, being brought back in 2015. But it’s a circuit with a great design and some special features that we don’t get to see anywhere else on the Formula 1 calendar. The stadium section, for example, lets us see the cars in a unique setting, surrounded by fans on all sides.

The Mexican Grand Prix has proven to be very popular among fans, with 372,000 spectators showing their support for local hero Sergio Perez in 2021. The circuit is 4.304 kilometers (2.674 miles) long with 17 corners. The cars complete a total of 71 laps around this track. The main straight features the longest DRS zone on the F1 calendar.

The Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez is owned by the government of Mexico City, which is in charge of maintaining and running the circuit. The Mexican Grand Prix first took place in 1963 after it was built thanks to the father of Mexico’s most famous racing brothers, Ricardo and Pedro Rodríguez, who, as an advisor, managed to convince the president of Mexico to build the racetrack.

21. Autódromo José Carlos Pace – State Ownership / Brasil Motorsports / Mubadala

The Brazilian Grand Prix is hosted in Sao Paulo and was once a regular-season finale for Formula 1. Due to the climate in the region, the weather conditions can often be unpredictable, and this can result in exciting championship battles, as we saw in 2008 and 2012.

The Autódromo José Carlos Pace, also known as Interlagos, is a short circuit, but with long straights and sweeping corners. It’s still a challenge for the drivers. Combined with mixed weather conditions, this race can often bring out some unexpected results – such as a Nico Hulkenberg pole position in a 2010 Williams, for example.

The Brazilian race track is owned in combination between the government and Brazil Motorsports. The circuit is also funded by Abu Dhabi investment company Mubadala, who have become the promoters of the circuit. This investment and injection of cash helps to keep the circuit on the calendar.

22. Yas Marina Circuit – Abu Dhabi Motorsports Management

The Yas Marina Circuit in Abu Dhabi first joined the calendar in 2009. The race has become the regular season finale since 2014. It’s also the first and so far only race in Formula 1 that starts at dusk and ends in the dark under floodlights, so it presents a unique challenge for Formula 1 drivers in terms of lighting conditions.

The Yas Marina circuit has a modern design, planned out by Hermann Tilke. The circuit was redesigned in 2021 to make it faster by removing some of the slower corners in the final sector, as well as removing a chicane in the first sector. This provided many new overtaking opportunities.

The Yas Marina Circuit is owned by the Abu Dhabi Motorsports Management company. ABMM is responsible for organizing all events at the Yas Marina circuit, not just Formula 1. The circuit is a popular venue for junior single-seaters such as Formula 4, which means that a lot of maintenance needs to be done to keep the track in good condition. 

23. Losail International Circuit – Qatar Motor & Motorcycle Federation 

The Losail International Circuit is not primarily a Formula 1 track, but the sport raced in Qatar in 2021 as several other circuits fell off the calendar due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Like the other Middle Eastern races, the Qatar circuit hosted a night race.

Despite the circuit being designed for motorcycle racing (such as MotoGP), it put on a great show with Formula 1 cars. So much so that the country signed a ten-year deal to host Formula 1 annually from 2023 onwards, although the exact circuit that will host these races is yet to be decided.

The Qatar Motor and Motorcycle Federation owns the Losail International Circuit and is responsible for organizing all events that take place at the track. The federation was founded in 1987. The current president of the organization is Mr. Abdul Rahman bin Abdul Latif Al Mannai.

24. Las Vegas Street Circuit – Liberty Media

The Las Vegas Grand Prix is set to be added to the calendar in 2023. The tight and fast street circuit will be 6.1 kilometers (3.8 miles) long, running down the Las Vegas Strip. The Las Vegas Grand Prix will be the third race in the United States.

The Las Vegas Grand Prix will break tradition by hosting the race on a Saturday evening rather than on a Sunday. This is because the event will be hosted during prime TV time in the US and to make the race start time more suitable for fans around the world.

The Las Vegas street circuit will be owned by Liberty Media, the owners of Formula 1. Liberty Media paid $240 million to acquire a city site for the paddock and pit lane complex. Las Vegas will remain on the Formula 1 calendar for the foreseeable future with such an investment from the owners of Formula 1.

25. Shanghai International Circuit – Shanghai Jiushi Group / Shanghai International Automobile City

The Shanghai International Circuit in China is another track that has been missing from the F1 calendar in recent years, and it may miss out in 2023 as well. However, the track is contracted with F1 until 2025, so we should see F1 cars return to the track eventually. 

This circuit is a fan favorite as it contains many unique sections, along with several long straights that are ideal for overtaking. The track is 92% owned by the Shanghai Jiushi Group with the rest of the ownership at the hands of Shanghai International Automobile City.

Other F1 Track Owners 

Kyalami – Toby Venter

The Kyalami race track in Johannesburg, South Africa, is reportedly set to join the Formula 1 calendar in either 2023 or 2024. Internal discussions are ongoing, with a decision on the exact date for the Grand Prix yet to be confirmed by Formula 1 and the Kyalami organizers.

The racetrack has recently been bought by Toby Venter, the CEO of Porsche South Africa. With a major overhaul and several upgrades, the race track is nearly ready to host Formula 1 once again, and the organizers are pushing for the venue to be added to the calendar with the backing of seven-time world champion Lewis Hamilton.

The track was built in 1961, and Formula 1 raced in Kyalami 18 times between 1967 and 1985. The circuit was not properly maintained and was eventually dropped from the calendar. In 1988 the layout was overhauled and it hosted two more Grand Prix, in 1992 and 1993. The circuit was put up for auction in 2014 and it was eventually sold to the South African billionaire.

Intercity Istanbul Park – Intercity Istanbul

The Istanbul Park race track first appeared on the Formula 1 calendar in 2005 to host the Turkish Grand Prix. The track posed a serious challenge to drivers as they had to navigate the daunting Turn 8, which is unlike any other corner on the Formula 1 calendar with its multiple high-speed apexes. 

The circuit dropped off the calendar in 2012. The Covid-19 pandemic put the newly resurfaced circuit back on the map as yet another replacement circuit for 2020 and 2021.

The Istanbul Park racetrack is owned by Intercity Istanbul. Intercity took over the race track in 2012 when it was removed from the Formula 1 calendar. The Turkish Grand Prix has always been a firm fan favorite with the excellent track layout, and many in the Formula 1 community would love to see it make a return to the sport.

How Much Does It Cost To Run An F1 Track?

It costs millions of dollars to run an F1 track, often costing $200 million or more just to build and pay for a contract. The track needs to be up to FIA Grade 1 standards, and it needs regular maintenance to keep it in prime condition, and the cost of running the event can be millions too.

Running a Formula 1 track requires a lot of maintenance. The owners of the circuit need to ensure that their track is always up to the strict FIA Grade 1 standards that cover things like facilities and track safety. The circuits need to be maintained on a daily basis to prevent them from deteriorating or becoming damaged.

There is everyday maintenance that needs to be done, such as keeping the tarmac clean and ensuring adequate drainage. Barriers need to be maintained, kerbs need to be painted, and the facilities need to be taken care of. In the buildup to the race, these maintenance elements become even more burdensome than the rest of the year.

Annual Fees

On top of the maintenance costs, the owners of the circuits also need to pay an annual fee to Formula 1 in order to host the Grand Prix. The fee is different for each track, with the range being between $20 and $60 million per year, depending on several factors.

The track owners and organizers are also responsible for selling tickets to the race, as well as setting up food stalls and other elements for the spectators. All of these costs add up for the owners of the race track, which is why the tickets are so expensive. But overall, they can often generate a profit from hosting a Grand Prix, thanks to Formula 1’s ability to attract lots of spectators.

Final Thoughts 

Formula 1 circuits are owned by different people. Sometimes they are owned by the state, and other times they are privately owned. Either way, millions of dollars go into the ownership of Formula 1 circuits, with the majority of them spending tons of money on race fees and maintenance to be allowed to host Grands Prix.